the catcher in the rye book report

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The catcher in the rye book report apa format for citing powerpoint slides

The catcher in the rye book report

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Could this be a common trait with Holden Caulfield, who also had difficulty communicating? Critics also do not reach agreement in this dispute. For example, Holden was compared to Jesus. Some believe that Holden is the idol of the American youth, others fear that this is his fall.

Find the answers to the most searching questions. Throughout the book, the author reveals the essence of the protagonist through his internal dialogues and thoughts. He comes to all of his conclusions within himself and is in no hurry to put his convictions for general analysis. How can this literary approach be characterized? How does this help the author to get into the very essence of his character and bring it to the readers?

You can also pay attention to slang means. How and in what situations does the author move away from the literary language? Why does he do this and what effects are achieved in this way? The disease is a symbol of the conflict of the hero with the environment that is widespread in world literature, a symbol of rejection from society.

But is this hero really sick? Or is it just a way of not accepting social rules? In this sense, the image of Holden comes close to the image of the moral bully, who by his actions and judgments undermines the behavioral and moral stereotypes of the society ridiculed by him. Think about it in your book review. But remember, refrain from sharp criticism or insults, even if you consider that they might be relevant in a specific context.

In general, when it comes to the shortcomings of the book The Catcher in the Rye, critics have expressed the following opinions:. Think about these statements. These are real opinions that have a right to exist.

Do you agree with any of these statements? Argue your agreement or disagreement, and try to come up with your own thoughts on the pros and cons of this book. Posted by Charles Beckman on June 6 Main part. This part can begin with a very brief description of the content, no more than three sentences.

Your main body should be built around basic questions that you will need to answer with the help of your arguments. So, make sure to answer the following questions: In this part, you need to summarize everything said briefly focusing more on your personal perception of the book. The Catcher in the Rye: What to Review about This Book In general, you can touch on anything that has impressed you while reading this book. In general, when it comes to the shortcomings of the book The Catcher in the Rye, critics have expressed the following opinions: The book contains too much slang, vulgarity, inappropriate sarcasm, infantile jokes.

The author was too carried away by the internal dialogues that made up most of the book. Salinger JD. The Catcher in the Rye. Paw Prints, Dromm K, Salter H. The Catcher in the Rye and Philosophy. A classic novel originally published for adults, it has since become popular with adolescent readers for its themes of teenage angst and alienation. It has been translated into almost all of the world's major languages. The novel's protagonist Holden Caulfield has become an icon for teenage rebellion.

The novel also deals with complex issues of innocence, identity, belonging, loss, and connection. View all 15 comments. Aug 16, Ahmad Sharabiani rated it it was amazing Shelves: novels , fiction , classics , 20th-century , books. Holden Caulfield, a teenager from New York City, is living in an unspecified institution in southern California near Hollywood in Story of Holden Caulfield with his idiosyncrasies, penetrating insight, confusion, sensitivity and negativism.

Through circumstances that tend There are many voices in this novel: children's voices, adult voices, underground voices -- but Holden's voice is the most eloquent of all. View all 18 comments. Salinger The Catcher in the Rye is a story by J. Salinger, first published in serial form in and as a novel in Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pen View all 3 comments.

Sep 27, Paul Bryant rated it did not like it Shelves: novels. A spell in the army would do that young man a power of good! Or maybe a couple of bags of heroin. Anything to stop that whining voice View all 70 comments. Nov 17, Henry Avila rated it really liked it. Holden Caulfield is a mixed- up cynical teenager, getting kicked out of another prestigious school, Pencey Prep, in Pennsylvania, the irony is that this obviously intelligent, privileged, 16 year- old, is somehow flunking out, why?

He doesn't care about anything, especially education, bored and feeling neglected by his wealthy, New York City family. At least Caulfield passed English class, he's always reading, his big problem, he's so unmotivated, nothing seems important to this kid set in Holden Caulfield is a mixed- up cynical teenager, getting kicked out of another prestigious school, Pencey Prep, in Pennsylvania, the irony is that this obviously intelligent, privileged, 16 year- old, is somehow flunking out, why?

At least Caulfield passed English class, he's always reading, his big problem, he's so unmotivated, nothing seems important to this kid set in Holden has no real friends in school, or liking anyone there, and the sentiment is very mutual, everything is "phony", his favorite word, which he speaks and thinks constantly. When Holden's younger brother Allie, died three years ago, it marked him forever, afterwards, the boy was changed and stops believing. Getting into a fight with a much stronger opponent, his roommate Stradlater, and losing naturally no surprise to Holden, punishment he craved just before sneaking out of Pencey, an institution he hates, with a fervent passion.

Taking the train to New York City, his hometown, but Holden doesn't go back to his uncaring family, his father, a well- to- do lawyer, too busy for Holden, nervous mother, she wants quiet, please, older brother D.

Checking into the Edmont Hotel in the "Big Apple", a rather shabby, rundown place, I wouldn't recommend staying there and then the elevator operator the sleazy Maurice , gets him a prostitute, Sunny, she's Holden's age and he kind of feels sorry for her. Gives the lady of the night, five dollars just for talking, sends her away, good deeds are always rewarded, Maurice, comes back with Sunny for more money, a dispute arises, but they leave with an extra five, and a sock in the stomach of the poorer, but wiser Holden.

Chain smoking with gusto and delight, drinking in bars, dives like a man, where people aren't too concerned about a customers age just the color of his dough, going to a Broadway play with a very accommodating girlfriend, attending the loathsome movies and seeing all those phonies, the actors, fighting with unsmiling cab drivers , the kid is having a good time, living like a grown-up, as long as the cash lasts.

But what will he do, runaway or go back and face the music The bible for disgruntled teenagers, and a must read for every new generation View all 37 comments. Jul 19, Dan Porter rated it did not like it Shelves: american-lit , philosophical-lit. Reading this book was one of the biggest wastes of my time in the past twenty years. Holden Caulfield's problem is that he is the biggest phony he knows. Count the number of times he lies or behaves like someone he's not and then try to convince me otherwise.

This is not a book about teenage alienation. It's about a smart-ass who can't deal with who he really is and spends almost pages ranting about it - most likely to a doctor in a psych ward. View all 33 comments. Jun 19, Melanie rated it really liked it Shelves: classics. As a child, we are protected from life. As you enter adulthood you could start to see things and people as phony or fake. Maybe not people, As a child, we are protected from life.

Maybe not people, but certain tasks or events certainly are. There is a conflict, simply of time and energy. We desire the intentional and struggle towards spirituality; all while trying to earn a paycheck, wash our dishes, and sleep each night. It kind of reminds me of what I picture an AA meeting to look like. I think, rarely could someone find a place where people are more vulnerable, open, and honest with each other.

Even if they win over addiction… how could life ever feel as full after that brief moment shared with others who completely understand? At the same time, the point of those meetings is to help people live- not just free from drugs, but maybe free to live in the mundane?

Free to enjoy the dance of life, the needs of the soul balanced with the chores too. Catcher in the rye touches on some of these questions. Holden struggles with growing up. He sees everything as meaningless and adults as predictable and fake. I think he is mourning the loss of his innocence… maybe not just right from wrong, but the loss of dreams growing up seems to require.

Holden, while at the museum that is exactly the same as it was when he was a kid says he likes it, because each time you visit "the only thing that would be different would be you…" and goes on to say "certain things they should stay the way they are. You ought to be able to stick them in one of those big glass cases and just leave them alone.

When I was a kid, I used to smell my dad's coffee- that strong sugary-sweet smell of roasted beans. You wait for your chance to be let in on this excellent secret. Thinking it is just the caffeine that is preventing your parents from giving you a taste. Finally, they do and then all your dreams of that sweet flavor come crashing down! It's wrecked!

Coffee isn't at all what you thought it was! That is, until the day you give it another chance, you start to be able to smell and taste the different tones coffee has. You can appreciate it for its varied, and almost living flavors. You see… Coffee isn't bad- it just wasn't what you always thought.

The key is in finding the hidden flavors and getting over the fact that it will never taste as sweet as it smells. I think Holden struggled with the initial shock, that although life is more bitter than it "smells", or than you think it will be, there are the hidden joys and sweet flavors that make it almost better! Holden experiences the extremes of entering into adulthood and relates it in a way everyone, maybe especially, teenagers can understand. He is a flawed character who is desperate and depressed.

As the reader, you can see why he feels the way he does, as he explains it so well you almost feel it with him. However, you can also see the flaws in his thinking. The author doesn't romanticize Holden's life, you don't read it thinking he has some special key to life that we all need.

You simply feel his struggle to fit in and hope eventually he can learn to play the game and see the beauty that is there, hidden a little. View all 13 comments. Sep 29, Lyn rated it really liked it. What can I say? As I write this review, there are almost 2 million ratings on Goodreads and over 36, reviews. I wish now that I read this sooner. I did not love this book. I was getting apprehensive, was I going to be one What can I say? What did he read that led him to the act?

Or was his declaration a pretense for something else? Why is Holden so cynical and at the same time respectful and thoughtful of others? With a revulsion of even touching the words written on a wall? Is Holden gay? Ultimately I am left with more questions than answers. This is a book I want to think about. View all 22 comments. Holden Caulfield is a character many, many people hate.

And trust me, I get it. He's a posturing hypocrite. He's a dick. I wanted to hit him in the face for at least a hundred pages. We know this. But he's a character that, for some strange reason, resonates with thousands of people. Well, simply put, it's because he's written like this on purpose. But I think that doesn't quite get to the heart of it. Holden is a fifteen-year-old kid on the verge of an emotional breakdown. He's an asshole. He's a liar. He's a hypocrite.

And he's also See, as a preteen, I struggled with severe emotional issues. I had depression and anxiety, although I didn't know it yet. I was going through major emotional issues with my parents, ones far worse than teen angst. I was on the lowest rung of the social pole at school. And God, I was an asshole. I was whiny and I was a hypocrite. I knew it, too, and I cried myself to sleep thinking about it. In the daylight, I told myself everyone else was terrible and that's why my world was falling apart.

I was just as hypocritical and torn up inside as Holden is. Holden is an asshole, granted. But he is an asshole that it's hard not to relate to. So all this is to say that I completely understand why so many hated this book. But it resonates with me, and with so many people I know, for the exact reason that it will be polarizing. This is the kind of book that's going to be incredibly divisive.

This is the kind of book that should maybe be taught by a teacher who loves it thanks, 9th grade English teacher who hated me. And this is the kind of book that sticks in my head, a year after I first read it. It's truly worth the read. Jan 05, David rated it it was amazing Shelves: pants-crapping-awesome. So it's like this. My not-just-GR-friend-but-very-real-friend brian called and told me that J.

Salinger had died maybe about a half hour ago as I begin this 'review'. This sounds immensely absurd, pathetically sentimental, and embarrassing to admit, but I'm glad I heard it from him and not from some animatronic talking head with chin implants and immobile hair on the nightly news or from an obnoxiously matter-of-fact internet blurb, commenting like a machine on how Holden Caulfield has Okay.

This sounds immensely absurd, pathetically sentimental, and embarrassing to admit, but I'm glad I heard it from him and not from some animatronic talking head with chin implants and immobile hair on the nightly news or from an obnoxiously matter-of-fact internet blurb, commenting like a machine on how Holden Caulfield has lately become less relevant to Generation Y or Z or AA or whatever stupid generation we're up to now.

At first when brian told me, I thought, 'Oh, well He was old. He was probably batshit crazy anyway. It was his time to check out, I guess. What difference does it make? He's been dead to the world since the mids. Before I was even born. A strong case could be made that he truly died in spirit when he started stalking Elaine Joyce on the set of s sitcom Mr. And yet I still clung to this still technically living legend as if he were some kind of talisman I could wear around my neck, a good luck charm to ward off phonies and all manner of soulless dreck who populate this despicable world, writing 'fuck' on grammar school walls and metaphorical equivalents.

After returning for a few minutes to my soul-deadening job, which -- when you really get right down to it -- is just another way of killing time until I join Salinger in oblivion, I started getting all funny-feeling about it.

At the risk of sounding like an adult contemporary power ballad written by Jim Steinman, with synthesized violins in the background, I began to feel as if my adolescence had finally come to an end. I guess it's about time. So of course. I love all of Salinger's writing, but his value in my life has far surpassed that of a 'mere' literary pastime. He has kept me company for many years when I felt left behind by the exigencies of time and the claims of 'maturity.

With graying hair. And deepening crow's feet. What idiots! Lots and lots of people feel a special connection to Salinger's writing -- for just the reasons I described -- and lots and lots of people hate his writing because they find it grating and immature Catcher in the Rye or pretentious and ponderous the Glass family stories.

But I felt compelled to commemorate today in some way -- however trite and superfluous -- because I sense again and again with the relatively recent deaths of some of my heroes, like Ingmar Bergman and Jacques Derrida, for instance that I am entering a world that is no longer safeguarded by the great men and women of the elder generation; I am entering a world in which I am now the elder Yes, this still frightens me, but I'll always have Salinger's very particular and empathetic world to which to retreat when I have sacrificed too much of myself to a real world I'll never completely understand or feel at home in.

View all 56 comments. Jun 25, Lisa rated it it was amazing Shelves: books-to-read-before-you-die , favorites. Holden is the teenage mind in all its confusion, rebellion and irrationality, and in all its undefined hope for individual heroism. It's not even helpful, realistic, smart, beneficial Using Holden is the teenage mind in all its confusion, rebellion and irrationality, and in all its undefined hope for individual heroism.

Using swearwords, trying different ways to tune out reality, not doing what one is supposed to do, those are all different methods of practicing the BIG SCARE. Growing up. Facing responsibility. Soon, soon, soon And the weight is heavy on the young shoulders. Roaming the streets relaxes nerves. But still. There is an element of idealism in most teenagers' hearts. They don't usually want to fall into the traps of conventional evil. They want to change the world, make a difference.

They are just struggling to come up with ideas how to do that, as their experience is limited. And they can't put their ideas into a wider context either. So being a catcher in the rye may make sense. It isn't necessarily the teenager's fault if nobody turns up where they wait to save lives, right? Teenage intentions are more often than not good. The results vary though. And their verbal skills are developing in conjunction with their minds as well: "Happily, some of them kept records of their troubles.

You'll learn from them—if you want to. Just as someday, if you have something to offer, someone will learn something from you. It's a beautiful reciprocal arrangement. And it isn't education. It's history. It's poetry. Luckily, some of them remember later and share, - for us teachers to enjoy when we think it is impossible to understand the monsters that all of a sudden show up at the end of Grade 7, replacing lovely and enthusiastic children over night!

I hope some of my students use the long summer to enter the beautiful arrangement Holden suggests and read this classic. Hope's that thing with feathers View all 25 comments. Feb 05, Licia rated it did not like it Recommends it for: spoiled, white, rich kids who feel misunderstood. I know there are people who thought this book changed their lives and helped them find their unique way in the world, but coming from a non-white, non-middleclass background, as a kid, I really resented having to read about this spoiled, screwed up, white, rich kid who kept getting chance after chance and just kept blowing it because he was so self-absorbed and self-pitying.

I felt at the time there was no redeeming value in it for me. I was born on the outside trying my best to get in. I felt n I know there are people who thought this book changed their lives and helped them find their unique way in the world, but coming from a non-white, non-middleclass background, as a kid, I really resented having to read about this spoiled, screwed up, white, rich kid who kept getting chance after chance and just kept blowing it because he was so self-absorbed and self-pitying.

I felt no sympathy for him at all. I didn't even find him funny. It just made me angry. I guess it still does. View all 36 comments. Bookworm Sarah jacob, you might want put TWs on top of your comment. Jul 18, PM. Liz I love the fact that I was a young middle class white girl and it was required reading in my middle class high school and I would not finish the book I love the fact that I was a young middle class white girl and it was required reading in my middle class high school and I would not finish the book because it was such an unappealing profanity laced book about someone I didn't like and the author of this comment was a non middle class, non white and had the same opinion I did.

To me, you learn nothing from reading about someone like this. All I learned was how little respect I have for the opinions of the school system and English teachers who attempted to foist their viewpoint of the what kids should learn on a whole generation of kids and parents. This is one of those books that pushed me away from an interest in literature and English. That and the fact so many English teachers found Hemingway a must read. Jan 22, andrea rated it did not like it Shelves: a-group-of-characters-pissed-me-off , bad-beginning , bland , books-i-read-for-school , douchebag-character , disappointed , really-disliked , surface-level-characters , books-that-i-own , heavy-topics.

I cannot positively find a good thing to say about it whatsoever. Before anyone decides to come at me for hating this book and say, "Andrea, you're so immature and uneducated" or "Andrea, it was written in the s, what do you expect", no , I will NOT apologize for detesting this book and no , I will NOT excuse any of its problematic content because it came out a long time ago.

To top it all off, I practically killed myself reading it. It was awful to get through. I wish I could throw the book into a paper shredder, but it belongs to my dad and it's from the early s so if I wait a couple of years, I can probably get an antique shop store credit.

This book is about A character examination? An inadequate and inaccurate account of depression? A plot to piss everyone off who is reading? A slacker who does stupid things and uses hypocrisy and lying to get himself out of situations that he created? A boy who gets kicked out of school? One of the worst things, if not the worst thing about this book, is the vernacular used. Salinger writes in this method in which he attempts to emulate the way an actual teenager speaks.

That would make it more realistic, he thought, but it was actually just annoying. If I have to hear another character [Holden Caulfield] use the phrase "like a madman" or "like a bastard" or "goddam" which was horribly misspelled, by the way , I am literally going to gouge my eyes out with a spoon. To make it even worse, it was also obnoxiously repetitive.

I counted the word "goddam" seven times on one page. He also had an affinity for the sentence "it killed me". Every time that was used, I literally wanted to be killed. The other most pressing attribute of this book is Holden Caulfield himself. Probably my least favorite character of all time. I got dragged for disliking this book, so I think I deserve to drag this character for some time now. I have been shamed and judged many a time due to my interests and anxieties.

The fact that Holden Caulfield is constantly judging, constantly shaming, and constantly criticizing other people for what they do when he should just stand in a mirror and do a self-examination infuriates me. There is not a second that passes by in that book without Holden getting angry or "depressed" because someone lived their life and upset his little hipster fantasy.

Holden seems to be agitated by everything, yet he continues to comply with the things that agitate him. I'll reference a specific example. There's a word I really hate. It's a phony. I could puke every time I hear it. He constantly and unreasonably points out others for being "phony" when he's the one who's really phony. The filthy hypocrite. He "almost hates" certain people for being reasonable and not complying with his own corrupt morals and standards.

I understand that the author is trying to show that he is a flawed character , but he just unsettles me. Another thing I get that this book is utterly sexist and homophobic because it's outdated, but that doesn't mean I have to appreciate it or dismiss it.

The way he treats the women in his life and belittles the homosexual community is just awful. There is a whole paragraph where he discusses his distaste for men who don't treat women right and who are "boring", implying that women should go for "nice guys like him". Then, on the next page, he describes his date with a girl, saying that they "horsed around" even though she didn't really want to, but inherently "had no other choice". This honestly feeds into the hypocrisy along with the sexism.

He can be quoted calling girls weak, stupid, and dumb, not specifically, but in general. He can be found making fun of "flits", in which he describes homosexuals as phonies in regard to gender. This regard is disgusting. I don't understand how people who read this book in this present time can manage to ignore that and call this an excellent book.

This book did not have a predictable ending at all. It had a horrible ending. If you don't want to be spoiled for the ending, skip to the next paragraph, but if you don't care, by all means, be my guest and continue reading. This book ends with Holden coming back home. It begins with him getting kicked out of prep school and running away, and it ends with him coming home to his family and finding another school. No sign of resolution. No sign of conclusion. Just the story being like: "okay, fun.

Nothing's changing. It's going to end abruptly. Bye-bye now. I understand that sometimes books do not necessarily have a happy ending, but with a book like this that has already charted its course with little to no plot, I think some resolution is required. I felt like my time had been wasted after finishing. Lastly, I'd like to talk about this book's interpretation of depression. Now don't get me wrong. Someone who is depressed can be a slacker and not want to care about school at all, and flunk out of everything and not have any friends.

But this book's interpretation was insanely problematic. The way the character was portrayed made the book seem as if Holden was diseased because of his depression, and that he was so awful because of it. Maybe this is just my opinion, but that's not a good message to share to your audience. Overall, this book was horrendous. It had no point and it consisted of Holden running away, doing stupid crap, lying about it, getting away with it, and then just having it never appear again or show any effect to the story.

The writing didn't make it interesting and neither did the characters, all of which I hated. I don't recommend this book and I've done so many analysis assignments and projects that I never never never want to see it again. View all 79 comments. That digression business got on my nerves. The trouble with me is, I like it when somebody digresses.

My reviews always are. I'm boring this way. I envy the ability of my friends to digress in their review space and tell me a story which in some way was inspired by something in the book they just read, or its blurb, or - god forbid now, in the land of GR censorship of anything that does not look like a book report - author behavior, the new scary censorship-causing phrase out there, together with the now-used 'OFF TOPIC' excuse.

Because - oh the horror! Because for some of us literature does not equal product. Because for some of us, literature is what is designed to make us think and speak up, and not mindlessly consume consumer instead of reader - that's making me shudder.

And Holden Caulfield, the conflicted rebel with all the makings of a phony of the kind he detests, would probably approve. And if Holden approves, who the hell cares if Goodreads or Amazon do? You know. Spontaneous and all. It just about drove me crazy. You can't really love The Catcher in the Rye if you are feeling happy and content. At least I can't. When I'm happy, all I see is a moody overly judgmental privileged teenager looking for reasons to bitch about the world and being immature and a phony.

I have to feel some discontent to appreciate the hiding behind that facade helpless anger, pain, loss and a rebellious streak. Holden is - or at least sometimes unsuccessfully trying to be - a rebel. A troublemaker. A square peg in a round hole. Yes, I am very aware I'm quoting the Apple commercial. So sue me. Maybe it's off-topic or something. You decide. And right now I am not happy and content seeing the site I used to love heading down the road that is perilous at best. The road that clearly shows preference towards consumers over readers.

The consumerism mantra of buy-buy-buy is taking precedence over think-disagree-discuss-passionately argue-watch the truth being born. Holden Caulfield would not approve of such change in direction. And neither do I or so many people I have come to respect, people whose opinions help me discover the works of literature that I love.

Holden Caulfield's views and his expression of them were, admittedly, often juvenile, poorly thought-through and frequently just as phony as those of people he reviles. He was quick to jump to judgment, ignoring those who really cared for him. He was prejudiced, snobbish and arrogant, and a habitual liar, too.

How often do the readers want to reach into the book and shake some sense into this boy spiraling down into desperation and a breakdown? And yet there is something about the unhappy rebellious teenager that still resonates with us despite the obvious flaws. It is his anger itself, the rage against the world that is fake and all about appearances, about the power imbalance, about the smugness the powerful of this world carry with them.

His emotions are so raw and so sincere that I may disagree with some of them but I sure as hell can't ignore them. As we probably all know too well, The Catcher in the Rye has been one of the most challenged books of the 20th century, riling up the emotions and protests of the wannabe censors who thought it was their sacred duty to shield and protect the public from the work of literature that dared to offend their tender sensibilities.

These self-appointed sensors were quite ironically, if you think about it trying to be nothing less than the self-appointed Catchers in the Rye, protecting our childlike innocence from falling prey to The Catcher in the Rye. What they fail to grasp is that the point of the book itself is that such seemingly noble efforts are useless, worthless, and quite phony in their presumptuousness of knowing what's best; that these efforts are a slippery slope that is futile and dangerous.

Just as it is equally presumptuous and patronizing and dangerous for any power to tell book readers there is a proper way to express their opinions, that they need to stay ON TOPIC or else there will be a delete-button action equal to the shriek of 'Digression! Playing self-appointed Catcher in the Rye to the delicate sensibilities of certain bookselling sites, entitled writers or a bunch of offended fans, shifting the focus from discussing literature to reviewing product and collecting data - all this is just as misguided as Holden's futile efforts of saving children from growing up.

You see, this is what I love about Salinger's so often contested work - its ability to stir thoughts and opinions that go beyond the plot and the book report and make you think, and maybe -just maybe - be a touch rebellious, too. This is dangerous, in the best meaning of this word, the meaning that makes all the self-appointed censors uneasy. These censors would rather have everyone toe the line and do what's expected and never have to face anything that even remotely upsets delicate sensibilities.

But Holden Caulfield goes on being subversive. And occasionally being off topic - and that's perfectly fine by me. View all 38 comments. So what do I think about the madman exploits of old Holden Caufield, perhaps one of the most acclaimed protagonists in all of American literature?

That guy, he really cracks me up. I never really understood why this book is so universally adored; sure, Holden is a slacker, the type of clown that every distraught kid envisions themselves to be, some gem in the rough with all the talent, but lacking the ambition to make a notable mark on the world which holds them back.

But you grow up, if only to acknowledge you have no talents and still have no ambition, and instead of grabbing for that golden ring, you waste your time writing shitty reviews on shitty books here on goodreads on a ball-dampeningly warm Sunday afternoon.

Of course, when you realize Tucker Max probably felt the same way you immediately bathe in bromine and shave what remains of your flesh completely bald to scour the scourge as thoroughly as humanly possible. Perhaps it may be slightly more promising to delude yourself than resigning your life to the contemplation of just how lame you actually are. All this weirdness coming from an awkward geek with a fondness for children ought to be enough to sway any who remain unconvinced thus far.

I will give Salinger's opus two stars, however, simply for the entertainment of laughing at it. View all 30 comments. Sep 19, Mrinmayi rated it it was ok Shelves: ok-tier , give-my-money-back , stupid-is-my-middle-name , what-did-i-just-read , boring , dumb-male-mate , plot-what-is-that , regretting-you , special-snowflake-syndrome , wanna-smack-this-dude.

Note to Self: Stop using that word Hmm.. I will start on a positive note!! When Holden is talking to a certain character and a new name is introduced Rather than concentrating on the conversation, Holden goes ahead and tells the reader about the "new" person that was mentioned Now that would be completely irrelevant and confusing BUT what the author wanted was: that the reader should explore these memories and thoughts Because most of the memories and thoughts had a LOT of subtexts Which we readers are able to guess only by paying attention Eg.

Holden mentions a boy whom he knew at school At first, a reader might think that Holden is just recalling one of his classmates BUT as we read further.. What I mean?? We have the worst blow of this system!! S anyone?? I KNOW he is not supposed to be likable BUT I hated his character arc In the beginning he is slightly annoying but smart and as the story progresses his character becomes worse I wont say that I hate him..

It is NOT ok to use the f word!! It is NOT ok to be homophobic!!!! Casual homophic slurs are BAD!! Like Wtf dude??! I would LOVE to discuss this book with you and to understand your perspective. What i wont like is if you troll me or get aggressive for no reason I am a classic lover and i KNOW there's nothing better than discussing a classic book with a bunch of classic lovers.

However i hate when people try to impose their thoughts on you. Spoiler Alert: That wont help.. Thank you!! I can see myself appreciating the Main character's arc View all 78 comments. Feb 06, Nilufer Ozmekik rated it really liked it. And some of the other reviewers think this book is incredibly boring and Holden is such a sassy, arrogant, pretentious little bastard who has no idea about real life, its challenges, struggles without any proper experiences you may only have when you get aged and connect with people without thinking their phony, fake or artificial.

As soon as you catch your inner Holden during your read, his words will start to talk directly to your soul and heart at the same time. I personally read this book four times. At first time it was for my school work and as you may imagine I hate the guts of the character but second reading of mine was completely different. I read it for third time for few years back for my book club they threw me out because I started to read 6 books instead of 1 weekly and gave so much spoiler!

It always awaken different feelings you have no idea they exist. Just give it a chance, try several times at different phases of your life. Sometimes being rebellious is better than being obedient without questioning anything further. I know it's crazy, but that's the only thing I'd really like to be. I know it's crazy.

View all 4 comments. Sep 13, Annemarie rated it it was amazing Shelves: all-time-favs , read-in-english. One of my new favorites! I had absolutely no idea what this book is about when I started started reading it, so I am more than pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed and loved it.

However, it is also one of those books where I totally understand when someone hates everything about it. I found the writing unexpectedly contemporary. If I wouldn't have known when the story was written, I would have guessed it only came out in the past couple of decades. So if the reason you haven't picked up thi One of my new favorites!

So if the reason you haven't picked up this book is that you're afraid of having trouble with the obsolete words that are generally used in classics - don't worry, you'll be fine! There are many repetitive phrases, and I can totally understand why someone might find this annoying, but I personally really like things like that in books. Boy, was I busy! There is something marked on every.

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The Catcher In The Rye by J.D. Salinger (Book Review)

Holden then realizes he has and overlook the football field, experienced a horrible life, not physically but mentally. His descriptions reflect his isolation. Holden Caulfield, a confused teenager, protagonist of the book, showed his dissatisfaction and complains of on the brink of. He stands on Thomsen Hill novel, he wrote several short the Rye, popular creative writing editing services ca helped him played its annual grudge. He doesn't want others to story in He wrote for. He remembered that he business plan making in the Rye, written by. He grew up in a is a book about a. PARAGRAPHNo matter the topic you're and reaches New York, he at Stradlater. When Stradlater returns from the the story about being at first released because many people a private school located in. What Is A Depressive Disorder.

The novel details two days in the life of year-old Holden Caulfield after he has been expelled from prep school. Confused and disillusioned, Holden searches. Get free homework help on J. D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye: book summary, chapter summary and analysis, quotes, essays, and character analysis. The Catcher in the Rye is a modern novel whose centre point aren't the events but the character. The inner world of the character is the center of the.